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4 Strategies for the Ideal Rural Recycling Solution

Posted by Trashcans Unlimited on

Recycling in rural areas can be a challenge. With cheap landfill access, little municipal oversight, local tax bases too small to support government-run operations, and low commercial and residential density placing homes and businesses too far apart for easy pickup, many rural communities struggle to comply with state-mandated recycling efforts. Rural recycling is now largely a volunteer-driven endeavor, like urban recycling efforts in the 1970s and 1980s.

"Some people and some places are much more involved, while other areas are not that interested,”says Jim Malia, director of the Rural Solid Waste Management Center in Knoxville, Tennessee, established by the Tennessee Valley Authority. "There is a sense of people wanting to do the right thing but they are not always sure what that is. Sometimes recycling is not a convenient alternative so it does not always get the attention it might deserve."

With state-mandated recycling regulations typically written with larger, urban communities in mind, different strategies are needed to help rural communities meet their reduction goals. This article will look at steps rural communities can take to develop an effective recycling program.

(Courtesy: Pixabay)

Consider a Regional Solution

Recycling is typically not a money-maker, and it’s unrealistic to expect a recycling effort to be self-funding. However, taking on the burden of recycling as a region can greatly decrease the municipal costs involved. Much like other resource-sharing programs — such as the Boards of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES), which supports small New York school districts in pooling educational resources and costs — an effective multi-jurisdictional resource-sharing platform for recycling can help bring rural communities’ recycling efforts level with those of larger cities.

This model is most useful for communities with inconsistent waste flows, such as vacation areas and communities with high concentrations of rental properties, where setting up a full-time recycling program would likely be wasteful.

Having a regional program increases the volume of the recycling waste flow, which opens cooperative marketing and exporting possibilities; reduces the use of regional landfills; creates a regional stimulus for new collection and processing jobs; and allows for cost-sharing in equipment, facilities, personnel, transportation, and capital cost.

Establishing a regional solution first requires establishing a conversation between solid waste producers, the public and private sectors, members of the public, government leaders, and knowledgeable persons with recycling experience. This group must be willing to put personal interests aside for the common good, in order to plan, create, and manage both a regional recycling facility and a regional recycling advisory committee.

Gaining this kind of support and involvement starts with providing education on the importance of recycling, as well as making recycling easier to do. This can include setting up recycling drop-off spots, providing recycling bins to residents, and installing recycling receptacles in public areas. A great place to source these bins is Trashcans Unlimited. Trashcans Unlimited offers the best prices on commercial and decorative trash cans and is a trusted source for all trash can needs.

Recycling should be a matter of community pride. When framed as a way of keeping the community clean, recycling can become an accepted requirement for being a good community citizen.

Identify Potential Recyclable Feeds

When setting up a recycling program, it is important to know what waste is being produced in the community in question. If there is an abundance of metal waste being produced, for example, but not much plastic, it makes sense to set up metal recycling lines in the recycling facility and make arrangements to ship this metal waste to the nearest major city’s municipal recycling center for handling.

The key to this is research. Manufacturers, intermediate processers, and any existing local recycling facilities will all have vital information on the materials being used, the expected output, and where the waste materials are currently being deposited. Performing a thorough survey to learn about the relevant intake and export markets, and to identify the biggest local producers of solid waste, is a good start. After reaching out to these local companies and facilities, routine follow-up letters and phone calls can help maintain a good working relationship with these major stakeholders in the recycling effort.

Similarly, a public outreach campaign can help identify what challenges and frustrations residential consumers are facing in relation to recycling, and what can be done to make the process easier. Such outreach programs should be conducted on a regular basis, even once the new recycling program has been established, and should make the public free to communicate their concerns.

(Courtesy: Pixabay)

Explore and Understand Export Markets

To keep a recycling program thriving, it’s necessary to maintain a database of potential buyers and sellers of the waste feed. Without a clear exit strategy for the waste, even the best recycling strategy will fail. Pre-curated, multi-state databases are available from providers such as the Chicago Board of Trade, Enviro-South, and U.S. Customs. There are many selling options to consider, including exporting internationally. Mexico, for example, is a large consumer of used beverage containers and mixed paper, while Canada is an importer of aluminum and cardboard.

To discover which countries are importing large quantities of specific types of waste, PEERS data and U.S. Customs are invaluable resources. PEERS data, which is privately provided, can also be used to secure contacts in those countries.

After gathering all necessary information on local waste production and export opportunities, it’s crucial to keep this list updated constantly.

Develop a Friendship with the Recycling Industry

An important step in developing a strong recycling plan is to be on friendly terms with others in the field, who may already have the answers to common questions. Joining recycling communities, establishing good relationships with other recyclers and with exporters, and developing an advisory committee of recycling educators and recycling advocates not only shows a commitment to recycling, but also provides a cushion against problems likely to afflict first-time recyclers. A cooperation agreement, for example, may allow for reciprocal processing of waste in neighboring facilities, reducing the need for individual processing lines.

Recycling in rural areas is challenging, but not impossible. The right attitude, a little luck, and patience can lead to a reduction plan that matches or even exceeds the big players.

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